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COW ELECTION 2011

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About the 2009 Terrace Mountain Wildfire in Kelowna B.C.

Plus

Comment on the Terrace Mountain Wildfire

LAST UPDATE September 22, 2013

Click on your refresh button in the top menu, to be sure you see any updates.

Blue Divider Line

IN 2009, THE NORTH WESTSIDE ROAD AREA WENT THROUGH A VERY TRYING TIME WONDERING FOR WEEKS IF THEIR HOMES WERE GOING TO BE DESTROYED BY WILDFIRE.  THEY WERE EVACUATED TWICE FOR A WEEK OR SO AT A TIME.

SOME DIDN'T WAIT TO BE TOLD TO EVACUATE, AND LEFT BEFORE A WARNING WAS EVEN ISSUED THE SECOND TIME AROUND.

Blue Divider Line

Great time lapse video of the Terrace Mountain Fire on YouTube

Another YouTube video showing how fast the Terrace Mountain wildfire was growing

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World's largest water bomber returns from Mexico to home B.C. base
By Sandra McCulloch, timescolonist.com - May 24, 2011


The Martin Mars water bomber: One like this has just returned from Mexico, where it worked on eight different complexes, or groups of fires.


Photograph by: Gerry Kahrmann file, PNG

Most trips to Mexico are relaxing vacations, but the Martin Mars water bomber has just returned from a 20-day contract that saw it working harder than it ever has in its 66-year lifetime.

The world’s largest water bomber arrived back home at its base on Sproat Lake near Port Alberni last week, said Wayne Coulson, who owns the water bomber through his Coulson Group of Companies.

“It was really good for us,” Coulson said of the Mexican assignment.

Coulson hired a scientific research firm to draw up an independent analysis of the performance of both the Mars and its accompanying Sikorsky helicopter, which is equipped with infrared camera and other high-tech gadgets.

“This is the most intense scrutiny the Mars has been under in its history,” said Coulson.

“We did in excess of 70 drops. We had a camera on the ground and firefighters on the ground.”

The crews benefited from the repeated drops and subsequent assessments, Coulson said.

Coulson is focused on fine-tuning the plane’s performance to improve its desirability in the firefighting marketplace.

The Mexican fire bosses were able to take an active part directing the water bomber because they rode in the accompanying Sikorsky helicopter and had access to the various technologies.

“The incident commander would fly the areas of concern in the [helicopter] and they would determine where the best spot was to go,” Coulson said.

“We would confirm with the [helicopter] pilot that it was a safe run for the Mars, and we would go and film the drop of the Mars in thermal image.”

The plane worked on eight different complexes, or groups of fires, in northern Mexico.

The priority was to protect structures, ranches and areas important to people’s livelihoods.

“We were working with firefighters on the ground. They would be working fire lines and where the fire jumped the lines, the Mars would hit it,” Coulson said.

Coulson said his managers have spoken to managers now fighting Alberta wildfires.

“They know we’re here now,” he said.

smcculloch "at" timescolonist.com

Copyright (c) The Victoria Times Colonist

 

Province allocates millions to enhance wildfire protection
Kelowna Capital News - By Judie Steeves - April 08, 2011

Speaking in an area that was evacuated when the Mount Boucherie wildfire threatened to destroy Lakeview Heights, B.C. Forest Minister Steve Thomson announced Thursday that $25 million will be spent in the next two years on protection from wildfire for communities in wildland interface areas.

With a beetle-killed pine tree towering above his head, Thomson said the Strategic Wildfire Prevention Initiative, which is focussed on reducing the risk of interface wildfires, will be administered by the Union of B.C. Municipalities, with funding to local governments doled out on a cost-sharing formula.

This follows on $37 million provided by the federal and provincial governments for similar protection work, which was also administered by the UBCM.

Forest protection officer Jim Mottishaw demonstrated the work that has already been done in regional parkland off Trevor Drive in Lakeview Heights to help protect adjacent private property, and demonstrated how little smoke is produced when the work is done over two years, permitting the cut limbs to cure and dry before they’re burned.

He lit a small pile of the dead branches and ground fuels in forest which had been thinned and where trees had already been spaced out, to demonstrate the clean burning, quick disposal of those dry needles and wood.

“The threat of wildfire is close to all of us here,” said Thomson in making the announcement, surrounded by red-shirted forest ministry firefighters and government officials.

Thomson, the MLA for Kelowna-Mission, said neighbours he talked to prior to the announcement are positive about the work being done to reduce the risk from wildfire in their neighbourhood and they’re proactive about taking steps themselves to mitigate the possibility of wildfire.

The $25 million program will be available over two years and involve all local governments and First Nations in the province, where more than 230 community wildfire protection plans have been completed since the Gary Filmon Report followed the Okanagan Mountain Park Wildfire in 2003.

That was one of his recommendations, that interface forest fuels by reduced by government, to help protect communities.

Mottishaw said fire crews from his ministry will continue to do spacing and fuel reduction and will also conduct low intensity burns in forested areas near human communities.

“People are more understanding of the need to manage the forest. Burning is one of the tools,” he commented.

While chipping and removal of dead material is done whenever possible, he said that’s not always an option.

For instance, 550 trees were removed from 16 hectares of forestland on the north side of Mount Boucherie over the past couple of years and small piles of dry wood were burned with little smoke.

There is another 16 hectares on the site that still need to be spaced and pruned and the debris burned.

Where the funds will be allocated has yet to be decided.

jsteeves "at" kelownacapnews.com

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Controlled Debris Burns on Terrace Mountain

The Ministry of Forests and Range Kamloops Fire Centre advises Wildfire Management Branch staff will be conducting controlled burns of debris piles resulting from the cleanup and rehabilitation of fire guards created during the 2009 Terrace Mountain wildfire.

These burns will take place when air quality and venting conditions are appropriate over the next several weeks as the fire hazard is now at a safe level and the risk of wildfire is minimal. Visible smoke or flames from these controlled burns are of no threat to homes or forested areas.

View Ministry News Release

(October 19, 2010)

Source - RDCO's What's New

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INFORMATION BULLETIN

2010FOR0179-001277
Oct. 18, 2010
Ministry of Forests and Range
Kamloops Fire Centre

CONTROLLED BURNS TO TAKE PLACE ON TERRACE MOUNTAIN

KAMLOOPS – Wildfire Management Branch personnel will be conducting controlled burns in the vicinity of the 2009 Terrace Mountain wildfire over the next several weeks. When the burns are conducted will depend on appropriate weather and venting conditions.

During the rehabilitation of fire guards last season, numerous large piles of woody debris were created. The piles to be burned are located above Westside Road, in the area north and south of Fintry Provincial Park, near where the 2009 Terrace Mountain wildfire was most visible to residents.

The recent cold temperatures and snow have reduced the fire hazard to the level where it is now safe to burn these debris piles. The chance that this prescribed burning will cause a wildfire is minimal.

The public should be reassured that any visible smoke or flames from these prescribed burns are of no threat to homes or forested areas.

For the latest information on fire conditions, open burning information and a map of where the controlled burns will be conducted, visit www.bcwildfire.ca.

Facebook and Twitter users can follow the latest wildfire information at BCForestFireInfo (www.facebook.com) and BCGovFireInfo (www.twitter.com).


Contact:

Michaela Swan
Kamloops Fire Centre
Fire Information Officer
250 554-5532
250 318-7456

For more information on government services or to subscribe to the Province’s news feeds using RSS, visit the Province’s website at www.gov.bc.ca.

Blue Divider Line

This sign was posted up on north end (Vernon end) of Westside Road July 2010 on the side of the road just after you leave hwy 97.

Under order of the Okanagan Indian Band Westside Road is officially closed to all Forest Use Activities July 2010

Under order of the Okanagan Indian Band Westside Road is officially closed to all Forest Use Activities July 2010

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These are photos the Fintry High Farm was given on a disk after the Terrace Mountain wildfire July - August 2009

 


That is a huge plume of smoke coming from the Terrace Mountain wildfire in 2009.

 

Photo of Terrace Mountain on fire in August 2009
This was the night that the Terrace Mountain wildfire flared up in August 2009.

 

Photo shows Terrace Mountain flaring up and the fire had spread farther down from the main fire.
Photo shows Terrace Mountain flaring up and the fire had spread farther down from the main fire.

 

These two photos below show the High Farm in relation to the Terrace Mountain Fire


You can see the Fintry High Farm at the far edge of the field and the fire advancing.

 


You can see they have the sprinkler going onto the side of this home at the Fintry High Farm.
That window looks like it isn't closed ... yikes!

 

Terrace Mountain wildfire at the High Farm in August 2009
Station 101 North Westside Road Fire Dept took this photo by the looks of it.

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Terrace Mountain to burn again
Castanet.net - by Kelly Hayes & Rachael Kimola - Story: 57559 - Oct 18, 2010

Forestry officials are still cleaning up after the Terrace Mountain Fire.

More than a year after the wildfire which consumed more than 9,000 hectares, crews are planning to start burning off debris piles which have been left to cure in large piles across the mountain.

Fire Protection Technician Dale Bojahra says a lot of fires are scheduled to be ignited over the next several weeks.

“After the Terrace Mountain fire in 2009, we had to do a lot of rehabilitation work. Along those 200 plus kilometres of machine guard that was put in, we had to go back and re-counter some of those areas and ensure there were no drainage issues, and (we had to) cut a lot of the timber out of the way which leads to a lot of debris left over. Now it's time for us to go back and dispose of those piles,” says Bojahra.

He says they will be burning between 500 and 700 piles.

“To the layperson that may sound like a lot, but to put it into perspective, one industry player alone may have 3,000 piles to burn over the winter to do with some of their operations.”

Bojahra says although some smoke is inevitable, they are taking steps to ensure there is as little as possible.

“That's one of the reasons we did leave the piles for an entire year, so they could cure better. We are working with our weather forecasters to ensure we are burning on days when the venting is good, which means while people will still see smoke and there will be smoke in the air, for the most part it will drift and vent out of the Valley.”

He says they have been burning test piles over the last several days.

“They are just lighting some piles off to see how they react and ensuring that they are taking into account the forest fuels and how dry they are, seeing what kind of spread rates we getting to ensure that nothing moves on us.”

Bojahra says they will be lighting the fires early in the day so that they mostly burn themselves out by evening, meaning the glowing embers should not be all that noticeable.

He asked that people who do notice the fires do not call 911 or the fire reporting line because the burns are controlled and pose no risk to the public.

Blue Divider Line

August 12, 2010 Highlights of the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Board Meeting

Nothing about Wildfire Employees Time Cards mentioned in the Highlights of the Regional Board meeting, except in the audio.

-------------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio August 12, 2010 audio of the entire Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting - Audio_Aug 12, 2010.mp3 - (48.5 MB)

Windows Media File Icon - click for help with audio August 12, 2010 audio clip of the Regional Board discussion only about wildfire employees time cards .wma (343 KB)

August 12, 2010 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Board Meeting Agenda

There is nothing about Wildfire employees time cards plan mentioned in the agenda of the Regional Board meeting, except in the audio.

-------------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio August 12, 2010 audio of the entire Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting - Audio_Aug 12, 2010.mp3 - (48.5 MB)

Windows Media File Icon - click for help with audio August 12, 2010 audio clip of the Regional Board discussion only about wildfire employees time cards .wma (343 KB)

August 12, 2010 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Board Meeting Minutes

There is nothing about Wildfire employees time cards plan mentioned in the minutes of the Regional Board meeting, except in the audio.

-------------------------------------

.mp3 file icon - click here for help with audio August 12, 2010 audio of the entire Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting - Audio_Aug 12, 2010.mp3 - (48.5 MB)

Windows Media File Icon - click for help with audio August 12, 2010 audio clip of the Regional Board discussion only about wildfire employees time cards .wma (343 KB)

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August 12, 2010 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Meeting Agenda

Item 5.1 Quarterly Program Measures Report.pdf

Protection Services:

019 - Electoral Area Fire Prevention (Page 54): The 2010 Wildfire season will see changes to the methods of department payment. A T-card system has been adopted to account for apparatus and personnel dispatched to a wildfire. Fire Service Agreement for Lakeshore, June Springs and Day Rd under review.

Country Rhodes agreement is also to be discussed and completed in 2010. FDM is used for all incident recording and a new Burning Permit form was recently created. An inspections solution is to be implemented through the addition of a Fire Inspection form and software. Fire inspections have commenced with the four RDCO volunteer fire departments.

August 12, 2010 Regional District of Central Okanagan Governance and Services Committee Meeting Minutes

5.1 Quarterly Program Measures Report - Year-to-date, June 30, 2010 Executive Summary

Staff presented the Quarterly Program Measures report, year-to-date June 30, 2010 Executive Summary which highlighted key areas in the Regional District services.

Questions:
• Dog Control- is that being enforced? Yes, except for the one section in the City of Kelowna.
• What is the T-Card system? An accounting form provided to the Ministry of Forests for tracking equipment and services used by the Regional District.
• Joe Rich Volunteer Fire Department - Medical First Response. Are we being compensated for accidents where the boundaries are in question? We are negotiating a mutual aid agreement with Big White. No costs are being reimbursed at this time. RDCO subsidizes this service. Staff have unsuccessfully tried to recover costs from the trucking companies, ICBC and the province.
• What role does the Province play? They provide ambulance services.
• Is the RDCO covered by insurance for calls outside of our jurisdiction?
Believe that we are, but will confirm.
The Chair noted that this is a provincial problem.

#GS50/10 SHEPHERD/EDGSON
THAT the Quarterly Program Measures Report - year-to-date June 30, 2010 Executive Summary be received;

AND FURTHER THAT Staff bring back a report on the status of the Mutual Aid Agreements with the Kootney Boundary Regional District for Big White;

AND FURTHER THAT Staff confirm the insurance coverage for Medical First Response call outs outside of the RDCO jurisdiction.

CARRIED

Blue Divider Line

HAS GOVERNMENT NEVER FINANCIALLY ASSISTED OTHERS WHO HAD NO FIRE INSURANCE?

THEN WHY ARE THEY ONLY PICKING ON THIS FAMILY?

OWNING LAND DOESN'T MEAN YOU HAVE A ROOF OVER YOUR HEAD OR A PLACE TO REST, OR COOKING EQUIPMENT, ETC.

WHY SHOULD THESE PEOPLE HAVE TO SELL THEIR LAND AND BE FORCED TO MOVE SOME WHERE ELSE?  WHY SHOULD SOMEONE BE FORCED TO MOVE BECAUSE OF A WILDFIRE?  ITS NOT THESE PEOPLES FAULT, BUT YET WHAT OTHERS ARE DOING IS BLAMING THESE PEOPLE BY NOT ASSISTING!  IN FACT WHAT SOME ARE DOING IS DOWNRIGHT DISCRIMINATION. 

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE IS NOT MEANT TO BE DOLED OUT DEPENDING ON INCOME LEVEL OR WHAT YOU MAY HAVE ACCUMULATED OVER YOUR LIFETIME IS IT?

NO, YOU ONLY GET BASIC ASSISTANCE AND EVERYONE DESERVES BASIC ASSISTANCE.

Fire victims face rebuilding their lives
Kelowna Capital News - By Barry Gerding - July 20, 2010

Standing amidst the rubble of what used to be their home, Greg Cruickshank and Jennifer Lockstead-Hicks survey the fire destruction of their garage, where Cruickshank spent many hours tinkering on old cars, an old boat and a Harley motorcycle, along with a collection of tools he had spent a lifetime accruing. Their property was the only one seriously damaged by last week’s Seclusion Bay fire.
Sean Connor/Capital News

The couple who lost their home to the Seclusion Bay Fire last week have begun the arduous process of rebuilding.

Greg Cruikshank and Jennifer Lockstead-Hicks are not only rebuilding their home, but also their lives, moving past the personal possessions that were lost in the blaze.

And they are doing so with a major regret hanging over their heads, that they did not renew their house insurance this year.

“We made a decision to cancel our insurance and that is a huge regret for us now, but we are trying to focus on the positive and move forward from that,” said Lockstead-Hicks.

That decision, coupled with the fire damage, may also exclude them from any emergency relief funds from the provincial government.

That funding vehicle does not cover damage for losses that could have been insured.

As a comparison, the mud slide damage to property owners in Oliver caused earlier this year was given some emergency relief mitigation because you can’t insure against a landslide.

“For all that we lost in the fire, we are grateful for what we still do have.

“It could have been worse. But not getting insurance was a dire mistake for us that I would wish on no one.”

When the Seclusion Bay fire broke out last Monday, Cruikshank noticed the smoke coming from the Kelowna side of Okanagan Lake.

Cruikshank, who works in road construction, called Lockstead-Hicks and told her to grab their eight-year-old daughter Makayla and evacuate the house.

“It all happened so fast,” Lockstead-Hicks recalled. “After Greg called, I gave my daughter a beachbag and said she had five minutes to pack anything important to her. I went downstairs in our home to get the cat and our passports, and she grabbed some pictures, a pair of prescription eyeglasses and Greg’s diabetic treatment medical supplies.”

“We ran out of the house and made our way down to the water where a boat was taking people to safety. “

Lockstead-Hicks, whose father was former New Democrat MLA and Powell River mayor Don Lockstead, said the fire showed no mercy on their home and an attached building that served as Cruikshank’s workshop.

“The only thing left is the chimney,” she said. “The heat was so intense it melted everything, the hinges off of doors, the window glass was turned into puddles.”

In the workshop and also lost were an old Harley Davidson motorcycle and dune buggy that Cruiskshank tinkered with to fix up, along with his welding and other shop tools.

The couple have lived on the Seclusion Bay property, encompassing 5.4 acres of land with a 314-foot access to the waterfront, for the past 14 years in what Lockstead-Hicks described as a modest house.

“It was nothing fancy, just a small two-bedroom family home,” she said.

“I can’t imagine leaving here now even after all of this. This is still home to our family even though the house is gone.”

The property had been for sale earlier this year with a listing price of $6.4 million.

The couple did receive a call from Premier Gordon Campbell shortly after it was learned their house was destroyed by the fire, but since then they’ve heard nothing about support from the provincial emergency program.

“We went to see our MLA Ben Stewart but his staff told us we are actually in Bill Barisoff’s riding (Pentiction-Okanagan Valley), so we are trying to make contact with them,” she said.

An account to accept donations has been set up at the RBC branch in West Kelowna, and donations can be made to the following account—0500 1010776. Donation registries have also been set up at the local Home Depot and Home Outfitters stores.

The District of West Kelowna has also done what it can do to help out the couple, said Lorne Raymond, manager of finance for West Kelowna.

“We try to help out where we can,” Raymond said. “But we are not in a position to provide financial relief.
That is a function of the provincial emergency program and people in the community who want to come together to offer financial help.”

Raymond cited the example of the West Kelowna fire, where a number of individuals and agencies came together to establish a local relief fund to help people affected by the Glenrosa fire.

That fund was taken off the books earlier this year, when the remaining $21,000 was donated to the West Kelowna food bank.

“We administered that fund on behalf of the community but it wasn’t up to us how it was spent,” Raymond said.


He said the district is currently doing what it can to sign off on allowing Cruikshank and Lockstead-Hicks to remain living on the property in two small separate outbuildings that weren’t damaged by the fire.

West Kelowna officials were at the site Tuesday morning to access if the living conditions passed acceptable district dwelling bylaw standards as a place of residence.

“There are safety issues involved that need to be assessed along with things like water and sewer that we need to look at,” Raymond said.

Jason Brolund, a Kelowna Fire Department assistant fire chief and regional liaison for the emergency program, said the family received 72 hours of lodging along with food and other necessities in vouchers after being evacuated, and that was extended a further three days after the evacuation alert was lifted.

Counselling is also available, Brolund said, to assist with the emotional trauma that is associated with a fire destroying your home.

“Because of what happened here in 2003 (with the Okanagan Mountain Fire), we have a good counselling support system in place now for that kind of thing,” Brolund said.

However, the Seclusion Bay property has not been ruled eligible for disaster financial assistance, Brolund noted, because the losses could have been reimbursed by insurance.

For Lockstead-Hicks, the Seclusion Bay fire is the third that she and her daughter have had to evacuate from, the other two being last year’s Glenrosa blaze and an earlier fire in Powell River.

“We are not asking for charity and are very grateful for what we do have. It could have been worse,” she said.

“I’ve been off work for the past two and a half years to raise my daughter. But now I will probably have to start looking for work again.”

bgerding "ar" kelownacapnews.com

These poor people will need all the emotional help they can get due to government and some people being asswipes!!!  Why don't they qualify for help if they didn't buy insurance, I am sure these people are not the only ones who Government has helped that didn't have insurance.  Just because they own expensive property doesn't mean they are rich.  These people have to pay taxes and they are not cheap.  Why is there discrimination in what you may have accumulated in your life no matter the value of the land.  People don't live on land they usually live in a building.  If you lost everything no matter what your land was worth, would you not need help to rebuild your basic necessities?  There sure is something wrong with government and some people these days.... there is no compassion for these people and why not?  I am sure these people are not rich after they pay their lakeside property tax.  There are many people that have owned lakeside property for many years and there are many people who are barely able to hold onto their lakeside properties in this day and age due to high taxes for lakeside property.

Blue Divider Line

Wildfire victim was uninsured
by Ron Manz - Power 104 - Story: 55750 - Jul 14, 2010

Greg Cruickshank, his common-law wife Jennifer Hicks and their eight-year-old daughter are left with nothing following Monday's Seclusion Bay fire.

Their home, their garage and their boat were all destroyed during Monday morning's wildfire.

To make matters worse, he had no insurance.

"Insurance just got so expensive it was ridiculous and we decided that what are the chances of two forest fires in two years," says Cruickshank.

"It's a weird thing. I've spent my entire life building a home and a house and collecting all this stuff. Now you're sitting here with absolutely nothing. I don't even know where to start."

The family will start by camping out on the property once the evacuation order is lifted for the next little while until they figure out what to do.

Cruickshank says he received a phone call from Premier Gordon Campbell on Tuesday and hopes the province will be able to provide some financial assistance.

"It's just a devastating loss. We lost everything. We can't replace it, it's as simple as that. We're hoping that the provincial government can come to the table and give us some help."

A trust fund has been set up in the Cruickshank's name at the Royal Bank. He says monetary donations would be most helpful right now.

Ministry of Forests officials say the fire, which started after a tree fell on some power lines, is about 90 per cent mopped up.

A total of 67 people remain on evacuation order for a third day.

Blue Divider Line

Wildfires flare up around B.C.
By Tom Fletcher - BC Local News - July 12, 2010

Flames spread quickly Sunday at the Kluskus Fire near Tsacha Lake, 140 km west of Quesnel.
B.C. Forest Service

Drivers on the Okanagan Connector got a reminder Monday of how volatile summer weather conditions can be in B.C.

At the connector summit, the highest point of the Coquihalla Highway system, windshield wipers were clogged with wet snow that can sweep down on the mountain pass at any time of the year.

Descending to the junction with Highway 97, they found the route south to Peachland was closed due to a fast-spreading forest fire that was forcing evacuations of some residents.

"I could feel the heat through the windshield," said Environment Minister Barry Penner, who was driving to Kelowna for meetings Monday.

Highway 97 was shut down in both directions a few minutes after Penner drove through, and an evacuation order was issued for homes in the Seclusion Bay neighbourhood on Okanagan Lake.

A stretch of hot weather after a cool, wet spring has pushed much of central and western B.C. into the "high" or "extreme" forest fire hazard range, with pockets of the same dry conditions in the Kootenays and Rockies in the east of the province.

Four of the largest fires are in northeast B.C., near the Stikine, Teslin and Sheslay Rivers. A fire near Buckley Lake in the same region was estimated Monday at 2,300 hectares. It was being monitored and allowed to burn within limits set by forests ministry staff to allow natural benefits of burning to be maximized.

A fire discovered Sunday at Tsacha Lake, 140 km west of Quesnel, and soon spread to 350 hectares with hot temperatures and high wind. Rain showers overnight slowed it down, allowing the 60 firefighters and four helicopters to make progress in containing it.

Last year saw a record total of 3,049 separate fires, battled at a record cost of $409 million. On Aug. 1, 2009 the forest service recorded 154 new fires, the biggest single-day total ever, and at the peak last summer there were 700 fires being fought at once and thousands of people evacuated.

A total of 242,170 hectares were burned last year, about three times the average for recent years but still lower than the 2003 fire season where many homes were lost in the Thompson and Okanagan regions.

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.pdf icon June 10, 2010 Regional District of Central Okanagan Regular Board Meeting Minutes

There was consensus to add Directors items to the agenda.

Directors Items Requiring Action

a) Director Hayes noted that in recent discussion with the BC-SPCA, the Province has indicated to them they will no longer pay overtime for staff during wildfires and that grants for cruelty investigations have been cut back. A request to cover possible shortfalls in the Kelowna SPCA budget due to a reduction in provincial support may come forward for consideration by the Board.

HODGE/HAYES
THAT a letter be sent to the Province expressing concern regarding the cut to funding provided to the BC-SPCA for overtime pay of staff during a wildfire emergency and funding cuts for cruelty investigations.

CARRIED (Findlater opposed)

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SPCA still feels wildfire fallout
Kelowna Capital News - June 03, 2010

BCSPCA chief executive officer Craig Daniell spends time with Sierra, a border collie cross brought in by dog control to the Kelowna SPCA in May. He’s in Kelowna to take part in a fundraising golf tournament to benefit the shelter. For the full story see page A3.
Sean Connor /Capital News

It’s been nearly a year since the disaster that put BCSPA staff and volunteers in the line of fire, but the organization is still treating burns incurred by the financial fallout.

“What the community needs to understand, is that the shelter functions at 100 per cent capacity all the time,” said Mike McGee, branch manager of the Kelowna BCSPCA, recalling the wildfires that sent he and his staff into the Westside hills to rescue hundreds of animals that had been stranded in homes, while their owners waited and worried.

“So to bring 500 animals, that’s very taxing.”

As BCSPCA volunteers and staff rescued stranded pets, costs mounted. They had to cover the wages for the employees who worked straight through the first 72 hours, and worked overtime for the next two weeks. All other operations during the fire were put on hold as caring for displaced animals became the biggest issue.

“Thankfully, with the support of several rescue groups, we were able to spread out the workload, but it was costly,” he said. Only 1.3 per cent of BCSPCA funds are covered by the government. The other 98 per cent is raised through charity drives.

What made last year’s wildfires more damaging to the local SPCA’s books, is that the government usually supplies funds to augment losses, but this year was different, explained Craig Daniell, CEO of the BCSPCA on his way here for a weekend golfing fundraiser.

“Approximately, seven years ago, we responded to the fire situation in the Kamloops area and we had a lot of staff in the field at that time, responding to animal issues in the region and our costs ran up over $100,000 at the time,” he said. “We were reimbursed a significant portion. Unfortunately last year in the Okanagan wildfires we found ourselves on the front lines, but when discussing potential for reimbursement with government, we were told there would be none whatsoever.”

Adding insult to injury, is that a grant of $75,000 was also cut, and when all is said and done that’s put them in a rough spot.

“We have to say OK, what are we going to do differently this year? We simply won’t be able to be at the front line of every single emergency—we don’t have the resources to do that,” Daniell said.

The SPCA is now turning to the public, hoping they can ramp up fundraising drives. This weekend there’s a golfing tournament, and later in the summer is the regular Paws for Cause event.

“The only way we can operate a shelter like Kelowna is through public support, so we fundraise through the year,” said Daniell. “Events allow the community to connect with the SPCA, learn about the shelter and raise funds that allow us to continue working.” For more go to www.spca.bc.ca/branches/kelowna

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Food bank to benefit from wildfire funds - Photo
Castanet.net by Wayne Moore - Story: 54491 - May 12, 2010

The Westside Community Food Bank is about to receive nearly $25,000, thanks to funds raised during the 2009 wildfires.

A cheque for $3,164 will be turned over to the food bank through proceeds of commemorative t-shirts from the 2009 West Kelowna complex fires.

T-shirts have been sold by the West Kelowna Fire Department.

Proceeds to date total $3,164, monies which will be turned over to the food bank.

Fire Chief Wayne Schnitzler, told council 765 t-shirts are left to sell. He says if all of the shirts sell for the $20 price, that would mean another $15,300 for the food bank.

T-shirts are still being sold through the fire hall, municipal hall office and will also be available at various events throughout the community and around the valley.

Meantime, Mayor Doug Findlater told council nearly $22,000 remaining in the Fire Relief Trust Fund will also be turned over to the food bank.

"This is the balance of the Fire Relief Trust Fund of donations that was provided last summer. The Red Cross and community committee that administered those funds made a determination that it should go to the food bank," says Findlater.

"The two largest donors which are the Telus Community Ambassadors and the West Vancouver Police Department, have also indicated they in fact support these funds being given to the food bank."

Mayor Findlater will present a cheque representing the balance of donations to the trust fund to the food bank Thursday afternoon at the food bank office.

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This Terrace Mountain evacuee was denied any help with the Wildfire Relief Fund by West Kelowna because they asked too late.  The Terrace Mountain Wildfire started approx. July 19, 2009 and the evacuee didn't ask for help until they absolutely had to and now they can't get help as of May 24, 2010.

Terrace Mountain evacuee was denied any help with the Wildfire Relief Fund by West Kelowna because they asked too late - page 1 of 2

Terrace Mountain evacuee was denied any help with the Wildfire Relief Fund by West Kelowna because they asked too late - page 2 of 2
click letter to read larger print

This evacuee contacted the Red Cross whom said it was too late and that the Red Cross could not help either.

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B.C. bracing for 2010 fire season
By Tom Fletcher - BC Local News - April 15, 2010

A B.C. Forest Service firefighter works on a wildfire near Fintry north of Kelowna last summer. There were more than 3,000 separate forest fires in 2009, the most on record for a single year.  Photo

VICTORIA – With low snowpacks in many areas and a long-range forecast for a hot summer, the B.C. Forest Service is bracing for a fire season to rival the record-setting summer of 2009.

Last year saw a record total of 3,049 separate fires, battled at a record cost of $409 million. On Aug. 1 the forest service recorded 154 new fires, the biggest single-day total ever, and at the peak last summer there were 700 fires being fought at once and thousands of people evacuated.

A total of 242,170 hectares were burned last year, about three times the average for recent years but still lower than the 2003 fire season where many homes were lost in the Thompson and Okanagan regions. Forests Minister Pat Bell said the fact that only seven buildings were lost in 2009 shows that lessons learned in 2003 have helped in preventing and battling wildfires.

One of those lessons was removing fuel from interface areas around dwellings. While 158 B.C. communities have fuel management plans completed or underway, another 92 do not.

Bell said the ministry assigned staff to the effort last fall, and 20 of those communities now have begun the work. About $8 million remains in a fund administered by the Union of B.C. Municipalities, and along with the federal-provincial Job Opportunities Program, that should be enough to cover the fuel removal projects for this year, he said.

About 40,000 hectares have been cleared of wood waste since the program got underway in 2006.

The fire prevention work paid off in containing many of last year's fires, notably the Glenrosa and Alexis Creek fires, said Brian Simpson, director of the B.C. Forest Service wildfire management branch.

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Embracing the new reality
Kelowna Capital News - By Judie Steeves - April 09, 2010

Tolko’s woodlands manager, Murray Wilson, says the Terrace Mountain wildfire burned so hot the soils now can’t absorb rainfall because they’re bereft of organic material, so there are concerns about slides with runoff. Wildfires and beetle kill are just some of the climate change impacts the company is dealing with.  Photo

Kelowna city manager Ron Mattiussi is confident the city is well-positioned to deal with climate change, but he questions whether its residents are.

“I believe we know what we need to do; the question is whether the community does,” he told a group of forestry professionals during a panel discussion entitled “Climate’s changing, things are happening in our watershed—Are we ready for it?”

For instance, he says the city is trying to wean its citizens off using so much water, but he’s not confident they’re going to fully embrace the new xeriscaping standards.

“We’re already getting pushback,” he said.

“We’re doing drought management plans. The question is, is society ready to change? Change hurts. Being comfortable is easier,” he added.

He gave the Okanagan Basin Water Board full marks for doing such great work, and said he is glad to now have scientific data available to show where the Okanagan basin is at in terms of water availability and the demand for it.

Tolko’s woodlands manager, Murray Wilson said the company operates on 765,000 hectares in the Okanagan, of which 140,000 hectares are in 28 watersheds, involving 1,600 separate water licences.

Last year’s Terrace Mountain forest fire impacted 10,000 ha in Tolko’s tree farm licence, he told delegates to the annual meeting of the Association of B.C. Forest Professionals.

He said it was such a significant burn that pine trees simply disintegrated, and the soils left behind are so hydrophobic that even when it’s raining, you can kick up the duff layer with your foot. The moisture doesn’t soak in.

That’s a real concern because of the potential for slides, particularly on some of the steep slopes that were burned, he said.

While he says they can’t control the impacts on riparian areas, they have gone in and put in larger pipes under roads.

The impacts of mountain pine beetle in their operating area is not new, even though this is the most devastating cycle ever seen in this province because warmer winter weather has failed to control their numbers in recent years.

He noted they have taken steps to reduce the impact of dead pines by minimizing roads, increasing the drainage control on road systems, enlarging stream buffer zones and planting.

More tree patches and single trees are left behind to help stabilize logged areas, he said, and in some areas spruce and balsam is being left behind.

However, he predicted that water issues will increase as a result of climate change and the impacts of the massive infestation of pine beetles.

Pine beetles are probably the greatest impact we’ll see from climate change in the short term, commented hydrologist Don Dobson.

That’s expected to result in more water running off more frequently and faster, with the massive losses of forest cover.

He wondered whether stream crossings are adequate for higher flows, and he warned there will be an increased risk of wildfire with the forest full of huge fuel loads of dying pine and warmer temperatures.

There are questions about whether the hydrology of the watersheds will behave as predicted, he said.

There hasn’t been much research, and there are not nearly enough hydrometric stations in place around the Okanagan basin to monitor stream flows, he said.

“We need the data to manage the resource,” he commented.

jsteeves "at" kelownacapnews.com

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NORD’s fire response acknowledged
Vernon Morning Star - By Richard Rolke - January 09, 2010

Last summer’s Terrace Mountain wildfire demonstrated the importance of neighbours.

On Wednesday, the Central Okanagan Regional District acknowledged the North Okanagan Regional District for the support it showed during the displacement of thousands of North Westside residents.

“We want to thank the regional district and the City of Vernon,” said Robert Hobson, CORD chairman, who presented a framed photo of the fire.

During the emergency, a number of local and provincial organizations operated a reception centre for evacuees and ensured they had access to basic needs such as accommodations, meals and clothes. Assistance was also provided for communications.

“All of these agencies stepped up to help their Central Okanagan neighbours,” said Hobson.

Hobson also gave credit to Vernon’s restaurant and hotel operators, as well as ordinary citizens.

“It was a disruptive thing for the citizens of Vernon to give up their recreation facilities and they did so with excellent grace,” he said.

Hobson also made a pitch for increased co-ordination among the two regional districts when it comes to emergency planning.

“Disasters like floods and fires know no boundaries,” he said.

“A combination of climate change and pine beetle is leading to more hazards all of the time.”

And Hobson assured his North Okanagan counterparts that CORD is ready to roll up its sleeves.

“I hope we never have to reciprocate but if it ever happens, we will be there to help you too,” he said.

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Terrace Mountain fire area lacked protection plan
PublicEye Online - August 12, 2009

Central Okanagan's regional district didn't have a community wildfire protection plan in place for the site of the Terrace Mountain fire, Public Eye has exclusively learned. But a district spokesperson has said that didn't impact the region's response to the blaze, which forced the evacuation of thousands from their homes.

The regional district quietly announced it was looking for a contractor to develop that plan on July 9 - nine days before the fire.

Its purpose: to assess the wildfire threats outside the district's incorporated areas - such as Kelowna, West Kelowna and Peachland - and recommend measures to mitigate those hazards.

In an interview, district communications coordinator Bruce Smith confirmed Terrace Mountain is within the unincorporated areas encompassed by that plan.

At publication time, he wasn't able to say why the district didn't start preparing such a plan prior to now.

"It's maybe a question of timing, staffing, ability, funding, working on our priorities which was getting plans for the fire protection districts - I'd have to go double-check and see," Mr. Smith said.

Nevertheless, he added, "I don't think the lack of a wildfire protection plan had any impact in our ability to respond from a regional emergency program point of view".

But did it impact the severity of the fire, which the provincial government has said was human-caused?

Mr. Smith didn't have an answer, referring those questions to the ministry of forests and range.

For it's part, the ministry wasn't able to respond by deadline.

But Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives resource researcher Ben Parfitt said if a plan had been prepared and acted on, it could have reduced the severity of the fire.

"If you have a program that has been successfully implemented, where you've cleared out the brush, where you've cleared out a large number of trees, the evidence strongly suggests that you reduce the risk of fire," said Mr. Parfitt.

The regional district voted to apply for a grant to fund $15,000 of the plan's $49,995.75 cost on October 27, 2008.

The Union of British Columbia Municipalities notified the district it had approved the grant on July 3.

The contract to develop the plan has since been awarded to B.A. Blackwell and Associates Ltd., which will deliver a final copy to the district in December.

To date, five of the regional district's six communities have prepared community wildfire protection plans.

The following is a copy of the relevant portions of the bid document for the district's protection plan.

***

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
REGIONAL COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PROTECTION PLAN
RFP # 006-Pa-2009
KEY PROPONENT INFORMATION
DATE OF RFP ISSUE: July 9, 2009
CLOSING DATE FOR RESPONSE: July 20, 2009 at 3:00 p.m.

Contract Name: Regional Community Wildfire Protection Plan
Contracting Agency: Regional District of Central Okanagan Parks Services
Contact Person: Cathy MacKenzie, RPF
Forest Health Operator
Department: Parks Services
Address: 1450 K.L.O. Road, Kelowna B.C. V1W 3Z4
Telephone: 250-469-6232
Fax: 250-868-0012
Enquiries: Please direct all proposal inquiries c/o the Regional District's General
Manager - Parks Services at the above listed address. All email enquiries should
reference the contract name in the subject line and be sent to parks@cord.bc.ca.
Please use the above RFP description on all related correspondence.

***

RFP-3 Purpose

The Regional District of Central Okanagan is requesting submission of proposals from qualified and experienced Registered Professional Foresters, registered with the ABCFP, to develop a Region-Wide Community Wildfire Protection Plan within the RDCO boundaries.

The purpose of the CWPP is to provide a seamless, all encompassing wildfire risk assessment and provide hazard mitigation recommendations for areas adjacent to communities and rural wildland urban interface areas within the Regional District.

The Regional CWPP will update the existing CWPP's for the electoral areas, taking into account new and emerging forest health issues. It will also look to WUI recreational communities to assess the risk in these areas. The recreational communities must meet the threshold of an 'assessment area' as defined by the provincial strategic fire analysis.

The Regional CWPP is meant to supplement the existing municipal plans outside of the municipal boundaries, it is not meant to replace the existing municipal plans.

The completed RDCO CWPP will be required, where possible, to contain recommendations that link the RDCO program into these existing or planned programs.

As well, all of the electoral area communities (including the recreational communities) must be evaluated for the identification of priority areas to undertake 'on the ground' fuel management treatments.

In addition the region wide CWPP is expected to identify strategic landscape level fuel management treatments. Community watersheds have been identified by the RDCO as a significant value at risk. Where possible, strategic landscape level fuel management treatment recommendations should recognize these values and identify projects that will benefit both the WUI and the watershed.

These treatment proposals should identify and take into account the current land management status/ownership (eg: licensees, BCTS, BC Parks, utility purveyors) and the ability of the RDCO to partner with these agencies to complete the suggested treatments.

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Facts about Disaster Financial Assistance

In 2005, the Province increased the DFA eligibility amount for replacement or restoration from $100,000 to $300,000. Financial assistance is provided for each accepted claim at 80 per cent of the amount of total eligible damage that exceeds $1,000, to a maximum limit of $300,000.

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This is a sketch of a person of interest to the RCMP in relation to the Rose Valley Fire in Kelowna BC July 2009.

Person of interest in the Rose Valley Fire Kelowna BC 2009

The West Kelowna RCMP are seeking the public’s assistance in identifying the male in this composite drawing. The male in the drawing is only a person of interest in relation to the Rose Valley Fire. A witness observed the male in the area following the fire, and provided a description from which the sketch was rendered. The male is described as being in his 30s, tanned, with short brown hair. He was wearing a grey hoodie, blue shirt and dress style shorts. He was riding a newer black mountain bike. If you have any information regarding this individual, or about the West Kelowna Fires please call the West Kelowna RCMP at 250-768-2880 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

Email: ediv_internet_webmaster "at" rcmp-grc.gc.ca

Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bcrcmp

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Photos of the "High Farm" before the Terrace Mountain fire, which the Terrace Mountain fire burnt to the back door of a house up here.  The whole hillside is now charred.  We will try and get a photo in the spring to show you the after affects of the fire and devastation it caused.

 

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August 13, 2009 - Governance & Services Committee Meeting Minutes

6. Governance

6.1 Terrace Mountain Forest Fire - Update (verbal) R. Miller, fire services coordinator, provided an update on the Terrace Mountain Forest Fire noting that a state of emergency continues but as of yesterday the majority of residents have been allowed to return home under evacuation alert.

Regional District staff have been working at the Emergency Operation Centre (EOC) since the beginning of the fires in West Kelowna. Containment does not mean control - it means fire guards are in place - currently containment is 75%. It was noted that no structures have been lost in the Terrace Mountain fire.

Approximately 500 firefighters are currently working on the fire. Teams are from all over the world-Greece, Australia, California, Ontario, Quebec. EOC has worked extremely well coordinating the fire in both West Kelowna and Terrace Mountain.

Discussion occurred regarding the continuing concerns with dead trees in the area particularly utility companies ie: BC Hydro, Fortis cutting trees and leaving them on the roadside, dead trees on private properties, pine beetle damaged trees and dead trees in Crown lands. The question was raised whether there is anything local governments can do to get private property owners to remove their dead trees.

Staff noted that within the new OCP for the North Westside criteria will be established with new developments. It is believed that there are no other powers within the local government to force the public nor the provincial government to remove dead trees. It was noted that it is extremely expensive to remove trees and that local governments need to be cautious. Options need to be reviewed.

#GS68/09 SHEPHERD/BAKER
THAT a letter be sent to the Ministry of Transportation regarding the pine beetle debris along Westside Road, the resulting fire hazard being created, and what plan does the Province have to deal with this situation;

AND FURTHER THAT a letter be sent to BC Hydro and Fortis BC (copy the Ministry of Transportation) regarding the fire hazard being created by utility companies leaving tree debris in road right-of-ways when managing tree hazards on their equipment.

CARRIED

#GS69/09 SHEPHERD/FINDLATER
THAT staff be directed to contact the Province to review what options are available to local government, including a legal opinion, with regard to fire hazard on private properties created by dead trees as the result of the pine beetle infestation within the Central Okanagan.

CARRIED

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Support services crews earn major honour
Vernon Morning Star - By Richard Rolke -December 19, 2009

Efforts to support the evacuees of this summer’s Terrace Mountain wildfire have been recognized.

Vernon/Coldstream Emergency Support Services has been presented with the Justice Institute Foundation Heroes and Rescue Award for its evacuee reception operation during July and August.

“The team absolutely deserves it,” said Brent Watson, ESS co-ordinator.

The award is granted each year to individuals or groups for their heroic action in a time of crisis. This year, the award is going to those who responded to wildfires in B.C., including Terrace Mountain.

On July 22, ESS volunteers immediately jumped into action after the Terrace Mountain blaze forced the evacuation of 2,000 people from the North Westside Road area.

During an eight-day operation, the team and partner agencies assisted more than 1,500 people.

“They went beyond the call of duty to assist the evacuees,” said Watson.

The reception centre and group lodging facilities closed July 30, but the ESS team was on stand-by until the fire came under control in mid-August.

Watson believes the award validates the emergency response plan developed for Vernon and Coldstream.

“The success with the Terrace Mountain fire was the culmination of a lot of hard work and planning with other agencies,” he said.

However, Watson says ESS planning is always a work in progress and he and the volunteers are looking at ways to improve the response to the next disaster.

“We always have to be ready,” he said.

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Governance &Services Committee Meeting Minutes - August 13, 2009 (Pg 4-5)

6. Governance

6.1 Terrace Mountain Forest Fire - Update (verbal)

R. Miller, fire services coordinator, provided an update on the Terrace Mountain Forest Fire noting that a state of emergency continues but as of yesterday the majority of residents have been allowed to return home under evacuation alert.

Regional District staff have been working at the Emergency Operation Centre (EOC) since the beginning of the fires in West Kelowna. Containment does not mean control - it means fire guards are in place - currently containment is 75%. It was noted that no structures have been lost in the Terrace Mountain fire.

Approximately 500 firefighters are currently working on the fire. Teams are from all over the world-Greece, Australia, California, Ontario, Quebec. EOC has worked extremely well coordinating the fire in both West Kelowna and Terrace Mountain.

Discussion occurred regarding the continuing concerns with dead trees in the area particularly utility companies ie: BC Hydro, Fortis cutting trees and leaving them on the roadside, dead trees on private properties, pine beetle damaged trees and dead trees in Crown lands. The question was raised whether there is anything local governments can do to get private property owners to remove their dead trees.

Staff noted that within the new OCP for the North Westside criteria will be established with new developments. It is believed that there are no other powers within the local government to force the public nor the provincial government to remove dead trees.  It was noted that it is extremely expensive to remove trees and that local governments need to be cautious. Options need to be reviewed.

#GS68/09 SHEPHERD/BAKER
THAT a letter be sent to the Ministry of Transportation regarding the pine beetle debris along Westside Road, the resulting fire hazard being created, and what plan does the Province have to deal with this situation;

AND FURTHER THAT a letter be sent to BC Hydro and Fortis BC (copy the Ministry of Transportation) regarding the fire hazard being created by utility companies leaving tree debris in road right-of-ways when managing tree hazards on their equipment.

CARRIED

#GS69/09 SHEPHERD/FINDLATER
THAT staff be directed to contact the Province to review what options are available to local government, including a legal opinion, with regard to fire hazard on private properties created by dead trees as the result of the pine beetle infestation within the Central Okanagan.
CARRIED

 


July 19, 2009

 

July 31, 2009
Canadian Air Crane refilling down at fintry Provincial Park

 

August 1, 2009
Valley of the Sun August 1, 2009

 

August 5, 2009

This photo was taken from Winfield side of Okanagan Lake.  La Casa is to the right of this photo.

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INDEX WR INDEX ALL Advis. Plan Comm Alt Approval Ambulance Argo Road Maint. BC Hydro Budget 2010 Budget 2011 Budget 2012 Budget 2013 Budget 2014 Building Inspect Build Laws - BC Build Laws - RDCO Building Violations Bylaw Anon COW Elect. 08 COW Elect. 11 Director Edgson Dogs Easement Rds Elect. Boundary Environ. Advisory ESS Finances Fintry Develop Fintry Park Fire Anon Fire Boat Fire Bylaws Fire Dept. Fire Dept FOI Fire Hydrants Fire Minutes Fires  House FOI Act Friends Fintry Garbage Garbage Area Garbage Bylaws Garbage Com 08 Garbage Contracts Garbage Finance Garbage FOI Garbage FOI Garbage LaCasa Garbage Locker Garbage Minutes Garbage NOWESI Garbage Ombudsman Garbage Prob Garbage Secret Garbage Solution Garbage Survey Garbage Traders Governance Wide Government Grants-in-aid Helicopters History Killiney Beach Park Killiney Hall LaCasa Motorized Rec. NWCA NWCA FOI NW OCP NW Parks OKIB OKIB Logging OKIB Road OKIB Tax Peacocks Police Tax Property Tax RDCO RDCO Dog Minutes RDCO Jokes RDCO Policy RDCO Regs Report Animals Residents Network Septic Systems Subdiv. History T. Mnt After Fire Terrace Mount. Fire Trench Burner Vote Boxes Water Budget 08 Water Budget 09 Water Budget 10 Water Bylaws Water Construct Water FOI Water Grants Water Judgement Water L Fintry Water Laws Water Meters Water Minutes Water Rates Water Right-of-Way Water Survey Water System Water Systems Water VOS Water VOS Pics Water Wells Water Well Data Westshore Playgrnd Westshore Sports Westside Rd. WR Development WR Incorporation WR Overpass WRIC Zoning Bylaw 66 Zoning Bylaw 81 Zoning Bylaw 871

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Adv. Plan Comm. Alt. Approval Ambulance Argo Road BC Hydro Budget 2010 Budget 2011 Budget 2012 Budget 2013 Budget 2014 Building Inspection Build Laws - BC Build Laws - RDCO Building Violations COW Elect 08 COW Elect. 11 Director Edgson Dogs Easement Roads Elect. Boundary Environ. Advisory ESS Finance Fintry Develop Fintry Park Fire Boat Fire Bylaws Fire Dept. Fire Dept FOI Fire Hydrants Fire Minutes Fires House FOI Act Friends Fintry Garbage Garbage Area Garbage Bylaws Garb Comment 08 Garbage Contract Garbage Finance Garbage FOI Garbage FOI Garbage La Casa Garbage Locker Garbage Minutes Garbage NOWESI Garbage Ombudsman Garbage Questionaire Garbage Secret Garbage Solution Garbage Survey Garbage Traders Governance Wide Government Helicopters History Killiney Hall Killiney Park La Casa Motorized Rec. NW OCP NWCA NWCA FOI NW Parks OKIB OKIB Logging OKIB Road OKIB Tax Peacocks Police Tax Property Tax RDCO RDCO Dog Minutes RDCO Jokes RDCO Policy RDCO Regs Report Animals Septic Systems Subdiv. History T. Mtn After Fire Terrace Mnt. Fire Trench Burner Vote Box Water Budget 08 Water Budget 09 Water Budget 10 Water Bylaws Water Construct Water FOI Water Grants Water Judgements Water Laws Water Meters Water Minutes Water Rates Water Right-of-Way Water Survey Water System Water VOS Water VOS Pics Water Well Data Water Wells Westside Road WR Development WR Incorporation WR Overpass WRIC Zoning Bylaw 66 Zoning Bylaw 1981 Zoning Bylaw 871

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INDEX ALL Boucherie Rd Kaleden Kelowna Naramata Oyama Peachland Penticton Summerland Vernon West Kelowna Westside Road Winfield

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Index

Boucherie Road Kaleden Kelowna Naramata Oyama Peachland Pentiction Summerland Vernon West Kelowna Westside Road Winfield

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You will find local North Westside Road BC businesses, services, free classifieds, local arts and crafts, vacation waterfront rentals, plus much more located near and around Okanagan Lake BC.  We will be adding to this site, so come back and check it often.

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